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, and they make fire suits, and after 9/11 when the pentagon was attacked and they needed fire companies to put out that fire, they had different companies come from the virginia area and the dc area, and they noticed that only the companies that were wearing the fire suits were able to work through the night and deal with the pathogens and extremities that were in the pentagon building. one of the people, the commander in the pentagon, called up rob freeze, who was the owner of globe fire suits said we need 300 fire suits here tomorrow. rob said, what's the sizes? i don't know, figure out how to get them here. rob freeze, the small company in new hampshire of about 300 people assembled fire suits, and rob was the only one allowed to take a mercy flight after 9/11, the only one allowed in the air space, delivered the fire suits, and the firefighters used them to put out the fire in the pentagon. it's a story about patriotism, but it's more than that. i wanted to know, well, what is it that allowed globe fire suits to still have comparative advantages, and one of the biggest insights for globe f
. we had was within the pentagon. you would think that if you're sending more troops to afghanistan, those troops would go to places that were most critical, the places that the taliban were seeking to take over, the places that were most at risk, potentially a takeover of the country. instead, we wound up sending the first wave of new forces took part of the country with relatively few people. and i discovered the answer was simply tribal rivalries. not in afghanistan but in the pentagon. it turned out that the first wave of troops were u.s. marines. they wanted to bring their own helicopters, the own logistics. so they did was to work with u.s. army soldiers in the areas in and around the city of kandahar. it was this tale of our own services fighting with each other instead of fighting in common purpose against the enemy. and the stories go on. there was into fighting then the state department, within the u.s. agency for international development. and one other tale, i recount in some detail in the book, we had some real serious in fighting between president own national security
of the news and i read a telegram from the pentagon that my unit would be deployed at a certain embarkation point along with the 80 second airborne, but the repeated patrol would stand and become part of the pentagon lower. along convoluted answer to your question but that was it. >> the fact that you selected your particular team and going on to work on disasters around the world after a time in vietnam with the u.s. military and the un, ever seen a situation where the u.n. commander gets to pick the right people so you did the campaign. >> i did. the first sergeant, you say i listened to my assignment, please select -- they knew more than i did about their own men and i had a whole battalion. we were able to get some pretty good people. generally they did their duty. nobody lost their cool. we had one or two close incidents thereafter in front of the cafeteria. i found out they hated the deputy marshals, civilians running around in blue suits, they had a regard for us because we wore a uniform. part of the tradition of the south, patriotism first. they didn't give us too much trouble but
in korea because the pentagon says two bridgeway coming or going to embarrass us in congress will start asking nasty questions. so rich i wanted to fire five of the six commanders in korea and they basically told and you can do it, they do it on the down low. pretend it's rotation. they basically say the chief of staff has lied to congress, so keep up the faÇade. release the tradition of relief partly because in the small and popular messy worse, it's harder to know what success looks like. you can be successful. it was clear to me that general petraeus was successful during the search in extricating from iraq, which was his true mission in getting us out of the war in one form or another. we've got an interesting point from a secondary theme of the book, which is civil military discourse. i want to give a shout out to two people, bob obuchi suffered through reading my manuscript twice in the senate general doo boat if he is here. there you are. jim dudek is the exception to every i'm saying tonight about generals by the way. a couple of things about jim dudek district may, now retired
the military loses in korea, because the pentagon says to ridgway, you're going to embarrass us and congress will start asking massive questions, so ridgway wanted to firefight of his division commanders in korea. they basically told and you can do it but do it on the down low. >> pretend its rotation. >> and they basically say, joe collins, the chief of staff is already lied to congress about this, so just keep up the faÇade. we lose the tradition of relief partly because in the small unpopular message boards is harder to know what success looks like. yet you can be successful but it's clear to me i think general petraeus was successful during the surge in extricating the united states from iraq, which i think is true mission. in getting us out of the war in one form or another. you've got an interesting pointer which is a secondary theme of the book which is civil military discourse. i want to give a shout out to two people, bob who suffered through reading my manuscript twice, and lieutenant general jim duquette, if he is here. oh, there you are. gym is the exception to everything i'm sa
for them. i was at the pentagon and was there when a colleague of mine got a silver star for his actions in afghanistan. he was clearing a landing zone they called in the medevac he tried to clear the area he steps on one and he lost both legs and a left arm. when i say i am lucky with an average experience he is my reference. he may say he is lucky people put him three tourniquets on him. then we have a memorial in florida where the tax code to school for everyone who died in the line of duty since world war ii. we put more names on the memorial last year since 1945 and 120 since then 11. that number may feel low compared to the thousands we have lost that is 120 brothers and sons and we are a small community. that is the grief you process and your own fear of death and i don't have a good answer to figure that out but i am not sure i did but i tried to weave so as to threats that felt like it was happening at the same time so i would like to read from the beginning of the book to give you a sense of how it feels and running helped me spin as a first thing you should know is i'm crazy.
in chicago, the largest building outside the pelt gone in the country -- pentagon in the country. and he bought, you know, block after block in new york. i don't think in philadelphia. he didn't get this far. he was concentrated in new york and chicago and westchester and albany. he was of not yet where he wanted to be. and he demanded much from roosevelt, and roosevelt gave it to him. and roosevelt named him the first ambassador, the first irish catholic ambassador to the court of st. james. he became the ambassador to great britain. and it was one of the worst decisions roosevelt ever made. [laughter] he knew but somehow believed he could keep kennedy in check, but he couldn't. he copp. he couldn't. kennedy was two men. when he talked to his children, he was a cheerleader, he was an optimist. but in his relationship to the world around him and to the 20th century, he was a cassandra. having made his pile of money, he was convinced that it was going to be taken from him. he was convinced that democracy and capitalism would be taken from the united states. if the united states entered th
they transfer her to the pentagon, she meets a new best friend named linda tripp and linda tripp tape records every damn conversation and that is all down. and guess what? linda tripp is in cabbing with a bunch of right-wing people to get the information directly to ken star and we get the paula jones trial, and bill clinton is asked to testify, and bill clinton is asked the question did you ever have sex with a woman named monica? and he said no, i never did. no, i never did, clinton claims he was telling the truth because from his point of view sex is intercourse. regardless, the scandal breaks. scandal breaks. bill tells hillary clinton it's breaking and he said i didn't have sex with her. i tried to do whey could help her. and hillary stands by him 100%. first of all, she doesn't believe it. given the surveillance in the white house she doesn't think it's possible. she believes that the marital therapy they had done in '89, '90 '91 had been sufficient to restore the relationship. bill is very insecure that the point. the first thing bill clinton does after the charges are made, he asked d
that? and i want to say a word about sequestration. sequestration is about to kick in. the pentagon and our defense department is like a giant oil tanker. you got to turn it around in a very difficult and slow manner, because they have to make plans and they have to have contingencies -- procurement of weapons, have to do all the things that are necessary to make sure our men and women who are serving in the military are the best trained, best equipped and most professional in the world, which they are. but we're looking at sequestration here when the department of defense says it will decimate our adilt -- ability to defend this nation. shouldn't the president of the united states be concerned about that? but what is his own secretary of defense is saying and what his own chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, his selection, is saying. instead, we kind of joke around and tell people they're going to be here fear new year's eve. that's not the way to lead this nation. so i come to the floor and say to my colleagues, we need to get this done. we all know that we need to get this done
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9